we'll ride in the gathering storm

Oh no no, take me from my misery
There's no such, thing as living comfortably
There's no such, thing as going home
I'm not formed of myself alone
All the others, they just fade to black.
l-o-t-r:


“If you’re trying to please everyone, then you’re not going to make anything that is honestly yours, I don’t think, in the long run.”

Viggo Mortensen

l-o-t-r:

“If you’re trying to please everyone, then you’re not going to make anything that is honestly yours, I don’t think, in the long run.”

Viggo Mortensen

the-hobbit:

“A particular concern for Richard was Tolkien’s description of Thorin having a beard that is considerably longer than the one he has grown for the film. ‘I needed to find a reason for this and when I read Thorin’s account of how when his grandfather and father, Thrór and Thráin, came out of the lonely mountain after the attack by Smaug the dragon, they had singed beards. This gave me the solution: he has his beard cut short, as a mark of respect to the indignity suffered by them. Perhaps if he ever gets to sit on his throne again as king he’ll grow a big old beard and tuck it into his belt, just like Tolkien wanted!’”

Richard Armitage 

But let me ask you something about the staying power of myth. Why have these stories such a holding power on us? (X)

the-hobbit:

“I actually stole a little gem of that from him for my character. I wanted Thorin to lead with that quiet authority. I wanted him to inspire loyalty rather than command it, and that’s exactly how Peter Jackson works.”

Richard Armitage on Peter Jackson inspiring his characterisation of Thorin (x)

the-hobbit:

“So we made that decision that we were going to go younger, and then from that point in terms of Richard Armitage, he was the youngest actor to audition for that role. It had nothing to do with the fact that he is gorgeous (laughs), it had to do with the fact that he did a phenomenal audition and the notion that you had this dark conflicted character, but was also quite grunty, Northern, English – like a dwarf.”

Philippa Boyens on casting Richard Armitage as Thorin

the-hobbit:



“This’ll end our careers on the spot if we even open our mouths to sing.”


Aidan Turner on singing in The Hobbit

the-hobbit:

“This’ll end our careers on the spot if we even open our mouths to sing.”

Aidan Turner on singing in The Hobbit

the-hobbit:

“I won’t even tell you what June looked like.”

Graham McTavish on Peter Jackson’s Naughty Dwarf Calendar

How do you think Thorin would fare in our world today ?

the-hobbit:

“Did you spend a lot of time in hair and make-up?”

“I did. He didn’t”

the-hobbit:

“You know what, I always got Fili and Kili the wrong way around. But I did work out a way of figuring it out. ‘Kili’ means ‘cute’. ‘Fili’… well I can’t tell you what that one means, but you can imagine.”

Richard Armitage on how he differentiates between Fili & Kili

"‎Rape culture is a culture in which people who have survived a violent crime are asked to laugh about it because other people think it’s funny."

(via aneuromess)

Rape jokes are unacceptable and should not be tolerated under any circumstances.

(via yorubadiaspore)

"Women constantly finds themselves apologizing for their non-conformity to patriarchal values: “I’m a lesbian…but I don’t hate men, ” “I’m a feminist, but I still like girly things,” “I’m anti-porn, but it doesn’t mean I can’t have fun.” Female feminists still bare the brunt of their conditioning, feeling the need to diminish how powerful they are when they reject certain aspects of the sexist culture. Whether it means not needing male approval or male comfort, whether it means not being feminine-presenting, reaching outside the boundaries of hearth, home and their “innate” maternal drive, or not having any interests in fulfilling sexualized fantasies of female subjugation, female feminists often find themselves trying to lessen the impact of their beliefs. This manifestation of conditioning, where women try to avoid coming across as intimidating or anti-patriarchal, consoles and reassures men that we still know our “place” and is a product of us still wanting to hold some appeal to them, even if it means downplaying our anger and objections towards the sexism we fight so passionately against."

(via angrywomanistcritic)

No more apologies.

(via thirdwavefeminism)